What type of law protects you when you are whistleblowing?

The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 was enacted to protect federal employees who disclose “Government illegality, waste, and corruption” from adverse consequences related to their employment. This act provides protection to whistleblowers who may receive demotions, pay cuts, or a replacement employee.

What type of law protects a whistleblower?

Whistleblowing law is located in the Employment Rights Act 1996 (as amended by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998). It provides the right for a worker to take a case to an employment tribunal if they have been victimised at work or they have lost their job because they have ‘blown the whistle’.

What protections are available to whistleblowers?

The Whistleblower Protection Act (WPA) protects Federal employees and applicants for employment who lawfully disclose information they reasonably believe evidences:

  • a violation of law, rule, or regulation;
  • gross mismanagement;
  • a gross waste of funds;
  • an abuse of authority;

Who is an eligible whistleblower?

2. Who is an eligible whistleblower? An “eligible whistleblower” is a person who voluntarily provides the SEC with original information about a possible violation of the federal securities laws that has occurred, is ongoing, or is about to occur.

What is the purpose of the Whistleblower Protection Act?

The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from retaliatory action for voluntarily disclosing information about dishonest or illegal activities occurring in a government organization.

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Why is the Whistleblower Protection Act important?

One of the most recent federal laws established to protect those who call out perceived corruption is the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989. The law was enacted to protect federal employees who disclose government waste, fraud or an abuse of power from retaliation.